I'm Looking at the Stars

College kids literally don’t care about walking in the way of cars at school because we’re like “hit me i don’t care pay my tuition.”

(via cdeathhh)

"Hit me my thesis is due in 12 hours and I haven’t started it"

"Hit me I have a final in an hour and I didn’t study"

"Hit me I’ve been on a 24 hour drinking binge and I’m invincible"

(via combatbabycomeback)

"Hit me. You’re a university vehicle and I’ll get free tuition."

(via thisisgoodbyegravity)


theomegalomaniac:

i-like-pigeons:

thebubblyblonde:

mass-destruction:

cuemypulse:

iamsuperbat:

offmytitsonhappiness:

Can we just stop and appreciate Nicki Minaj’s face for a moment. She looks genuinely very concerned for Josh here, like she thinks he was actually in an arena full of kids trying to kill him, and is confused as to why no one else finds this as shocking as she does.

What do you expect? People from the Capitol just don’t understand.

People from the Capitol just don’t understand.

People from the Capitol just don’t understand.

People from the Capitol just don’t understand.

People from the Capitol just don’t understand.

THIS POST DESERVES MY REBLOG

(Source: mrsannieodair)


pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published
On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.
Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.
Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.
Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 
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pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published

On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.

Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.

Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.

Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 


nprontheroad:

The maximum capacity on Shell’s Olympus drilling rig and platform is 192 workers. That many people eat a lot of food—about 1650 pounds of meat every week. Included in that is about 785 pounds of beef, 370 pounds of chicken and 80 pounds of catfish.

Crews work a variety of schedules—two weeks on and then two weeks off is common. Those who work at night need quiet during the day. In the sleeping quarters you’ll see signs advising passersby that a “day sleeper” is inside. Crews share bedrooms—two or four to a room. Each bunk has its own television. 

The rig has an exercise room (shown above) and a game room that also has large-screen TVs and recliners. 

Tomorrow we visit Shell’s on-shore Deep Water Technology Centers in downtown New Orleans—more then… 


catskid100:

From now on Im going to speak like an anime protagonist giving an inspirational speech, because….. *clenches fist* because there are people who believe in me! People who are constantly giving me strength! And even if they’re not with me right now…. *faint smile at the ground*…. They’re always sending  me their wishes a-and I want to be able to give them courage too!!!!


ask-the-multishipper:

becauseimwolfit:

catbountry:

thefrogman:

Usually when people do that “you’re special” crap I tend to roll my eyes.

But when Mister Rogers said it…

That’s because Mister Rogers meant it.

Mister Rogers genuinely cared about everyone and that’s why he will forever be the best. All of my feels.

True fact: He was considered to be one of the hardest people to interview, because he would turn it around and ask questions about the interviewer with genuine interest. Asking about their children and spouses, their dreams of the future, etc.

(Source: magicfingers)